How to make Trini Curry Chataigne

Published on October 26th 2021 by Rachael Ottier Hart.
Last updated on April 1st 2024
This recipe, developed through the collective effort of at least six experts, underwent meticulous research and testing for over three months. Learn more about our process in the art and science behind our recipes. This post may contain affiliate links. Read our Disclosure Policy.
Aerial view of Trini Curry Chataigne with spoon on the side

Chataigne or Breadnut is found in the tropical regions of Polynesia, Asia Pacific, Africa, Central America, and the Caribbean. Breadnut, also commonly called Chestnut, is family to the Breadfruit; however, the exterior surface is covered with blunt spikes with large seeds encased in layers of white fibrous flesh. The seeds can be dry roasted and used to make a coffee-like drink, boiled in salt water and eaten like nuts or boiled and mashed into a paste and eaten like a dip similar to hummus. We in Trinidad use the white flesh for curry, and it’s often served during Diwali celebrations. So if you’re looking for a new curried vegetable experience, try this Curry Chataigne recipe.

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Time & Serves

Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
90 mins
Total Time
105 mins
Serves
10

Ingredients

  • 1 Kg Breadnut Flesh

  • 2 Tablespoons Green Seasoning

  • 3 Cloves Garlic

  • 1/2 teaspoon Jeera (Cumin) Seeds

  • 2 tablespoons Virgin Coconut Oil

  • 1000 ml Coconut Milk

  • 2 Tablespoons Curry Powder

  • 1 tablespoon Amchar or Caram (hot) Marsala Powder

  • 300 ml Water

  • Salt To taste

Instructions

Preparing Fresh Chataigne

When using the fresh fruit, make sure it's an unripe green Breadnut that's firm to the touch. Then coat your hands and wrists with cooking oil to protect you from the itchiness and stickiness of the fresh fruit.

Cut the fruit into quarters, separate the white flesh from the seeds and chop the white meat. Then, try our Breadnut Hummus recipe to utilize the entire fruit.

Alternatively, you can use pre-seeded flesh fresh or frozen.

Cooking the Chataigne

Using a bowl, season the flesh with the Green Seasoning, Curry Powder, and Marsala Powder.

Add the coconut oil and place it on medium to high heat using a large, heavy-bottom pot.

Once the oil is hot, add the whole garlic cloves and the Jeera Seeds and cook until burnt, then remove from the oil.

Carefully place the seasoned Chataigne flesh into the hot oil, stir using a wooden spoon, and let simmer for 5 minutes.

Add the coconut milk mixture, then reduce the heat to medium and let it simmer for an hour adding water if necessary while it cooks.

After an hour, make sure most of the liquid has been absorbed, and you are left with a light gravy throughout the Chataigne flesh.

After an hour, make sure most of the liquid has been absorbed, and you are left with a light gravy throughout the Chataigne flesh.

Cover and let it rest for 30 minutes or until warm to the touch for those eating with their hands.

Serve alongside your other curry favorites and your choice of roti or rice.

Rachael Ottier Hart
Author:

Join Rachael on a global culinary journey. With a passion for travel and diverse cuisines, she crafts recipes that weave flavors, scents, and stories into each dish, igniting your wanderlust with every bite.

More posts by Rachael Ottier Hart

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Keywords
curry chataigne, curry chataigne with roti, breadnut curry, curry chataigne recipe, chestnut

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Rachael Ottier Hart
Author:

Join Rachael on a global culinary journey. With a passion for travel and diverse cuisines, she crafts recipes that weave flavors, scents, and stories into each dish, igniting your wanderlust with every bite.

More posts by Rachael Ottier Hart